Ricotta and Chive Flower Ravioli

Photos and recipe by Carmela Sereno Hayes

 

The simplicity of pasta for speed, urgency, and the tummy rumbling need can never be looked down upon. From a simple bowl of pasta with butter and black pepper to little Pugliese ears of orecchiette with broccoli and fava beans or the baked perfection of a Sunday lasagne, for every day we are thankful for pasta.

I wanted to share with you my seasonal love of pasta using humble ingredients that have been heightened with a simple flourish of chive flower blossoms. Chive petals have a prominent sweet onion aroma yet, in disguise, they also offer sweetness along with beauty and absolute diversity.

For my oval ravioli I have chosen to laminate the pasta sheets with chive flowers, fill and serve them with browned butter and a final scattering of fresh petals purely for aroma.

 

Equipment required:

Pasta machine – Marcato Atlas 150

Large wooden board, with lip to secure

Pasta wheel, for cutting

Dough scraper

Pasta stamp of your choice (I used an oval stamp from Marcato)

1 sauté pan

1 saucepan

Ingredients

Edible flower and herb pasta lamination

 

Pasta dough:

 

150 grams (about 1 ¼ cup) 00 flour

50 grams (about ? cup) semola di grano duro rimacinata

100ml tepid water

2-3 chive blossom flower heads, depending on size

 

 

Soft edible herbs and petals can be softly pressed into pasta dough, creating a beautifully pressed sheet. I prefer to use the season’s abundance so a few suggestions could be springtime wild garlic flowers, chive flower petals, violas, borage flowers, daisies and rose petals to name a few. Plus, any soft herbs with no stems. Flat leaf parsley, thyme, sage and basil are my favorites, just stay away from any woody herbs such a rosemary.

 

  1. Pour both the 00 and semola flour onto a wooden board. Form a well and slowly add the water, working the flour as you go until a dough has been formed.
  2. Knead the dough until it is smooth and pliable. Cover and rest at room temperature for 30 minutes.
  3. Prepare your soft herbs or petals by making sure they are stem-free and clean.
  4. Roll your pasta dough out as you would a standard dough with a pasta machine and stop at number 4 on your pasta machine setting,  (For reference I use a Marcato Atlas 150.)
  5. Lay your herbs or petals over one half of the pasta sheet in any format and design you would like.
  6. Fold the other half of the pasta sheet over the petals and press down with your palms and knuckles to secure.
  7. Set the pasta machine on to setting 3. Roll the sheet through the pasta machine once on setting 3, 4, 5 and number 6, no folding.

 

Filling – ripieno & dressing

 

A simple yet classic filling works perfectly here, that said you can change and alter the filling to suit your own personal taste.

 

400 grams (14 ounces) ricotta

60 grams (2 ounces) Parmigiano Reggiano, grated, plus extra to serve

Freshly grated nutmeg, QB

Salt & pepper to season

150 grams (11 tablespoons) butter

2 chive blossom heads

 

  1. Combine the ricotta with the Parmigiano Reggiano, nutmeg, salt and pepper.
  2. Stir and check for seasoning, adjust as required.
  3. Take your pasta sheet and      place large teaspoon amounts of the filling along one side, lengthwise.
  4. Fold the pasta sheet onto itself (hotdog style)     and press down around the filling to secure each mound, making sure you have removed any trapped air.
  5. Press out each ravioli with your stamp or use a pasta wheel to make simple hand cut ravioli.
  6. Allow the ravioli to air dry on a bed of semola (coarse semolina) for 20 minutes.
  7. Cook the ravioli in a large pan of salted boiling water until al dente, around 3 minutes or so.
  8. Meanwhile, in a large sauté pan, melt the butter with a pinch of salt and pepper, until light and nutty in colour.
  9. Using a slotted spoon, gently add the ravioli into the butter.
  10. Serve with an extra drizzle of butter, a sprinkle of Parmigiano Reggiano and a final flourish of the edible chive blossom petals.

Buon appetite Carmela x